Tag: Theatre

  • Essay on the state of U.S. theater in “World of Theatre” published in Bangladesh and Paris, with book launch in China

    XIAMEN, CHINA and PARIS, FRANCE:  The International Theatre Institute (ITI) – the world’s largest organization for the performing arts – is holding its 33rd world congress at the Xiamen International Conference and Exhibition Centre in Xiamen, China, from Sept. 19 to 24, 2011.  Held under the auspices of UNESCO, the congress will have a strong education and artistic focus, as well as offer a sumptuous showcase of xiqu, the generic terms for Chinese music theatre. On this occasion, ITI will celebrate the book launch of the newest edition of The World of Theatre, an account of the world’s theatre seasons 2007-2008 and 2008-2009, for which I contributed a critical essay that sums up and critically evaluates the state of U.S. theatre from coast to coast. The U.S. Center of the ITI invited me to publish an essay on USA theater, summarizing the 2007-2010 seasons. The period which my essay considers coincides with dramatic unraveling of the Aught Decade, which resulted in a worldwide economic recession, and a political transition that brought about the rise of an African-American as the 44th president of the United States. The 2011 edition of The World of Theatre is a major biennial ITI publication that contains articles by ITI …

  • U.K.’s National Theatre Live re-broadcasts Richard Bean farce “One Man, Two Guvnors” on U.S. screens

    ACROSS THE UNITED STATES:  This past September, National Theatre Live, the popular initiative that offers theatrical performances on film screens, kicked off its third season with Nicholas Hytner’s feel good production of One Man, Two Guvnors, Richard Bean’s new version of The Servant of Two Masters by Carlo Goldoni, with songs by Grant Olding.  The farce, staged by Nicholas Hytner, stars  James Corden, who appeared in the National’s original cast of The History Boys. Starting Thursday, Oct. 20, National Theatre Live will re-air a live performance of the play at 200 cinemas throughout the U.S. through NCM Fathom’s digital broadcast network. The re-broadcast will be shown on 200 screens across the United States in venues such as the AMC Empire 25 in New York City; AMC Universal Cineplex in Orlando, FL; Regal Pavilions 15 in Denver, CO; Cinemark Anchorage 16 in Anchorage, AK; Cinemark Sam’s Town 18 in Las Vegas, NV and many more.  The average ticket price is $20. For a complete list of U.S. dates, times & locations, please check:  www.ntlive.com  or www.FathomEvents.com.   This classic update is expected to transfer to London’s commercial West End in November. National Theatre Live is an initiative by the UK’s National Theatre to broadcast live performances onto …

  • What is a Rasaboxes actor? A musician of emotions, in which India meets Western actor training

    NEW YORK CITY — In between scenes while performing Laertes in the Gallery Players’s production of Hamlet in Brooklyn, the young classical actor Dan Lawrence juices up his body to achieve what he calls “a rasic performance.” “Laertes appears early on in Shakespeare’s play and then he disappears, but when he re-enters the play, basically he is already in a high emotional state,” the 26-year-old Lawrence recalls in an interview near Times Square‘s Broadway district. “Laertes bursts into the kingdom, and he’s ready to kill. He suspects the king for Ophelia’s murder. Everything that happens, after he reappears, happens very quickly — it’s all discoveries, one thing after another. The part requires many different emotional qualities and aspects of awareness, so I definitely used rasabox training for that. While I’m off-stage for an hour, I can go through my script as much as I want, but the real question is, How am I going to enter that emotional state physically?” About 20 minutes before his reappearance, Lawrence decides to cook up breath, sound and movement so that he can taste the complex flavors of rasa when portraying a mightily pissed-off Laertes. “Before I entered the stage,“ Lawrence recalls, “I started …