Tag: Public Theater

  • "RepresentAsian" poster of AAAPAC: Asian American Performing Arts Coalition

    NUMBERS DON’T LIE | Asian Americans are challenging Broadway and nonprofit theaters with sobering stats on the lack of minorities

    The news may be good for black actors, but it is no song for the south for other actors of color. According to a new minority report, blacks were far more likely than any other minority to be cast in roles which were not specifically identified by their race and ethnicity. Asian Americans were “the least likely of the major minority groups to play roles that were not defined by their race.”

  • Nancy Kim Parsons, New York actor, at "RepresentAsian" | Courtesy of AAPAC

    ASIAN AMERICANS PUSH BACK | An actors’ coalition confronts Broadway and nonprofit theater leaders on the lack of minorities on NY stages

    This news story was first published here in February 2012.  It is being revived here to offer a broader context and close chronology to a new 2016 study which again takes to task NYC theater companies for failing to diversify their casting practices.   By Randy Gener NEW YORK CITY: The news may be good for black actors, but it is no song for the south for other actors of color. According to a new minority report prepared by a coalition of Asian American actors in New York, blacks were far more likely than any other minority to be cast in roles which were not specifically identified by their race and ethnicity. Meanwhile, Asian Americans were “the least likely of the major minority groups to play roles that were not defined by their race.” Today this coalition has released the entire report, entitled “Ethnic Representation on New York Stages: 2006/07 to 2010/11 Seasons,” a theater-by-theater breakdown of casting practices on Broadway and by 16 leading nonprofit theater companies. The conclusions have been described as incendiary and may provoke a long conversation around the complicated issues of casting and true diversity on New York stages. The latest findings released today are: Of …

  • Meryl Streep | Photo by Brigitte Lacombe

    Meryl Streep and Kevin Kline read Romeo and Juliet in Central Park in June

    NEW YORK CITY: So she’s 62 and he’s 64. So what? It’s a staged reading. And it rekindles a perennial what-if among those actors who’ve been paired over the years. On Monday June 18, Meryl Streep will play Juliet to Kevin Kline’s Romeo in a one-night reading directed by Daniel Sullivan (who is quickly establishing a name for himself as a Shakespearean interpreter). The event is 50th anniversary of Shakespeare in the Park at the Delacorte Theater, in which the Public Theater is charging tickets at $1,500 a pop. To make that night worth the price, Al Pacino will be honored for his body of work with the Public, which includes his playing Shylock in “The Merchant of Venice” in 2010. There will also be dinner al fresco and a party after the reading. The benefit event is being chaired by Public Theater Board Members Arielle Tepper Madover and Alexandra Shiva Maybe it is the ticket price that got people in a conniption. An Entertainment Weekly writer kvetched: Kline and Streep certainly have the gravitas to pull off Romeo and Juliet, but the wrinkled elephant in the room — their ages. Will Montague be played by Mickey Rooney? Will the nurse be less of …

  • Culturebot Conversations on Contemporary Performance

    Culturebot’s panel discussion on citizen criticism and the arts live-streams, takes place Jan. 15

    Culturebot.org, a multidisciplinary arts and culture blog, and the Public Theater‘s Under the Radar Festival have graciously invited me to participate in a panel discussion on citizen criticism and the arts during the festival. Curated by Culturebot.org, the discussion on criticism and the arts is entitled “Everyone’s A Critic! Exploring the Changing Landscape of Arts Writing.” It follows a discussion that pits visual-art performance against contemporary performance. And it will be livestreamed at  http://www.livestream.com/newplay. The actual discussion itself takes place Sunday, January 15 at 1PM at the LuEsther Lounge @ The Public Theater, 425 Lafayette Street. Here is the description: As the mainstream media continues to cut its arts coverage, an increasingly diverse field of citizen journalists has filled in the gap. Some decry this as a disaster, proclaiming the death of criticism. Others characterize this as a long-overdue democratization of critical conversation. The truth is probably somewhere in between. What is the role of the arts writer in today’s society – either “professional” or “amateur”, what is the difference between a reviewer, a critic and a crank, and what does the future hold? Participants: Randy Gener (editor and critic of CriticalStages.org and in the Theater of One World) George Hunka …