Liftoff of Orbital ATK Cargo Mission to International Space Station |  April 18, 2017

CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA |  The Orbital ATK Cygnus pressurized cargo module is carried atop the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket as it launches from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

The Orbital ATK Cygnus pressurized cargo module is carried atop the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Orbital ATK’s seventh resupply services mission, CRS-7, will deliver 7,600 pounds of supplies, equipment and scientific research materials to the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 11:11 a.m. EDT.

Orbital ATK’s seventh commercial resupply services mission, CRS-7, will deliver 7,600 pounds of supplies, equipment and scientific research materials to the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 11:11 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, April 18, 2017.

At about 6:05 a.m. EDT on Saturday, April 22, Expedition 51 astronauts Thomas Pesquet of ESA (European Space Agency) and Peggy Whitson of NASA will use the space station’s robotic arm to grapple Cygnus, which will be installed on the Unity module.


Cygnus Spacecraft Attached to Space Station’s Unity Module |  October 25, 2016

Orbital ATK’s Cygnus cargo craft (left) is seen from the Cupola module windows aboard the International Space Station on Oct. 23, 2016.

Orbital ATK’s Cygnus cargo craft (left) is seen from the Cupola module windows aboard the International Space Station on Oct. 23, 2016. The main robotic work station for controlling the Canadarm2 robotic arm is located inside the Cupola and was used to capture Cygnus upon its arrival. The Expedition 49 crew will unload approximately 5,000 pounds of science investigations, food and supplies from the newly arrived spacecraft.

The cargo aboard the Cygnus will support dozens of new and existing investigations as the space station crews of Expeditions 49 and 50 contribute to about 250 science and research studies. The new experiments include studies on fire in space, the effect of lighting on sleep and daily rhythms, collection of health-related data, and a new way to measure neutrons.


Cygnus Spacecraft Approaches Space Station in the Sunset |  April 26, 2017

On Saturday April 22, 2017, Expedition 51 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency photographed Orbital ATK's Cygnus spacecraft as it approached the International Space Station.
On Saturday April 22, 2017, Expedition 51 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency photographed Orbital ATK’s Cygnus spacecraft as it approached the International Space Station.

Using the station’s robotic Canadarm2, Cygnus was successfully captured by Pesquet and Commander Peggy Whitson at 6:05 a.m. EDT Saturday morning. The spacecraft’s arrival brought more than 7,600 pounds of research and supplies to support Expedition 51 and 52. The Expedition 51 crew worked to offload the new science experiments and crew supplies this week.


Cygnus Cargo Craft Released From Space Station |  June 15, 2016

Orbital ATK’s Cygnus cargo craft is released by the International Space Station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm in this photograph by European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake. Cygnus departed at 9:30 a.m. EDT on June 14, 2016, while the space station was flying above Paraguay.

Orbital ATK’s Cygnus cargo craft is released by the International Space Station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm in this photograph by European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake, who wrote: “We just said goodbye to #Cygnus OA-6 – a great spacecraft & thanks to everyone involved.” Cygnus departed at 9:30 a.m. EDT on June 14, 2016, while the space station was flying above Paraguay.

Aboard Cygnus is the Spacecraft Fire Experiment-1 (Saffire-1), the first of a three-part experiment that will be conducted over the course of three flights to investigate large-scale flame spread and material flammability limits in long duration microgravity.

At 3:30 p.m., once the cargo craft reached a safe distance from the space station, ground controllers at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio initiated the sequence for Saffire-1. Controllers at Orbital ATK in Dulles, Virginia, activated the experiment at 4:55 p.m. Telemetry indicated the cotton-fiberglass material blend is now burning successfully. Cygnus will continue to orbit Earth for up to eight days as it transmits hi-resolution imagery and data from the Saffire experiment. Following complete data transmission, the Cygnus spacecraft will complete its destructive entry into the Earth’s atmosphere on June 22.