Edited by Gary Daines

CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA |  As the Sun rises at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket vents liquid oxygen propellant vapors during fueling for the lift off of NASA’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-M. The satellite is the latest spacecraft destined for the agency’s constellation of communications satellites that allows nearly continuous contact with orbiting spacecraft ranging from the International Space Station and Hubble Space Telescope to the array of scientific observatories.

Atlas V Rocket and TDRS-M on Aug. 18, 2017

Photo credit: NASA/Kenneth Allen

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, with NASA’s Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, TDRS-M. TDRS-M. Liftoff was at 8:29 a.m. EDT. TDRS-M is the latest spacecraft destined for the agency’s constellation of communications satellites that allows nearly continuous contact with orbiting spacecraft ranging from the International Space Station and Hubble Space Telescope to the array of scientific observatories.

Photo credit: NASA

Atlas V Lifts-off with TDRS-M

TDRS-M is the latest spacecraft destined for the agency’s constellation of communications satellites that allows nearly continuous contact with orbiting spacecraft ranging from the International Space Station and Hubble Space Telescope to the array of scientific observatories. Liftoff atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket took place from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 8:03 a.m. EDT.

Model of SLS Rocket Into a Shock Tunnel for Testing | NASA engineers have teamed with CUBRC to better understand and analyze how the SLS is heated as it ascends into space.
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